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NEW - Therapeutic Touch Practitioner Certificate Program

I am very excited to announce that Langara College, here in Vancouver, will be offering a Therapeutic Touch Certificate Program! This is a brand new program which I have developed and will include all the courses, and more, necessary to receive the BCTTNS Recognized Practitioner Status.

There will be an information session held at Langara College satellite location, 601 West Broadway, Vancouver, BC at 6:30pm November 25th, 2014. Come and learn all about it!

Cheryl will be adding a new Therapeutic Touch course!

Therapeutic Touch Mentorship Course

This will be a one year program suporting your Therapeutic Touch learning. This course will include regular instruction and many opportunities to practice Therapeutic Touch including a clinical placement in a health care facility. 

This program may be started after Therapeutic Touch Level 1, 2, or 3. Therapeutic Touch Level 3 must be completed prior to the completion of this course.

For further information or if you are intersted in taking this course contact Cheryl at clarden@shaw.ca 

A Summary of Therapeutic Touch Research

 

Therapeutic TouchTM is a holistic, evidence-based therapy that incorporates the intentional and compassionate use of universal energy to promote balance and well-being1.

Therapeutic Touch is considered a pioneer among modern complementary methods of healing because it is the first healing modality in Western history to be formally taught as an intrinsic part of a fully accredited graduate curriculum of a college or university. This occurred at New York University (NYU), New York City, in 1975 in a masters-level course called “Frontiers in Nursing” (E41.2363).2

Therapeutic Touch is a gentle, non-invasive therapy utilizing near touch and light touch to support and stimulate the body’s own healing processes. There has been a great deal of research done on Therapeutic Touch. Therapeutic Touch has been shown to decrease anxiety and/or stress in the following populations: psychiatric patients with moderate to severe anxiety3, cardiovascular patients4,5, those undergoing cardiac catheterization6, those that have recently been diagnosed with breast cancer7, with those recently bereaved8, the elderly9, 10, 11, post-operative patients12, children with HIV13, chemically dependent pregnant women14, Alzheimer patients15, burn patients16, those who worked through or suffered a loss as a result of a hurricane17, healthy women18, and others19, 20.

Therapeutic Touch has been shown to decrease the perception of pain and/or decrease the need for analgesia in the following populations: vascular12, major elective or abdominal21, and coronary artery bypass surgeries22; fibromyalgia23;osteoarthritis24, 25; burn patients16; in the elderly9,26,27; cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy28; and others29,30.

Research suggests use of Therapeutic Touch accelerates wound healing31, 32, 33 and facilitates relaxation15, 22. It improves length and/or quality of sleep: in a critical care environment34, in chronic pain26, and the institutionalized elderly11, 35. Increased well-being has been shown in post-operative patients22, those experiencing dementia36, those with terminal cancer37, and with preterm infants with a gestational age of 25-37 weeks38. It has also been shown to improve depression26, quality of life23, increase function in those with arthritis24, 39, improve vigor18, decrease fatigue with cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy40, increase haemoglobin levels41, and decrease confusion42.

An in vitro study on normal human cells has shown Therapeutic Touch increases human cell proliferation43. A further in vitro study showed an increase in human DNA synthesis, differentiation and mineralization in osteoblasts (bone cells) and a decrease in osteosarcoma (bone cancer cells) with Therapeutic Touch44. A growing amount of research is suggesting Therapeutic Touch may positively influence the immune system58 by decreasing suppressor T cells45 and increasing natural killer cells46.

Therapeutic Touch has been safely practiced on people of all age groups. There has been research which demonstrates that Therapeutic Touch can be safely done on premature infants, less than 29 weeks gestation56; and that in preterms, 25 – 37 weeks gestation, the data suggests that it aids in their physiological and behavioral development and well-being57. Research has been done with children13, 19, and countless research studies have been done with adults and the elderly.

Therapeutic Touch has been shown to be effective in populations often thought to be fragile, such as preterms, children, the elderly, people with cancer, and dementia.

 

There has been a lot of research done on those with Alzheimer’s disease showing: decreased anxiety15; decreased vocalization, decreased manual manipulation, decreased disruptive behavior47,48; decreased pacing49, and decreased physical non-aggressive behavior. Using Therapeutic Touch may delay and/or prevent pharmacological therapies that could decrease the individual’s quality of life.

Another population that has been researched is those experiencing cancer. Therapeutic Touch has been shown to decrease anxiety7, 59, decrease fatigue28, increase well-being37, and decrease pain, and be beneficial in insomnia and needle phobias59.

As can be seen by reviewing the research above the amount of research with Therapeutic Touch has been extensive with more research continuing to be done.

For an easily downloadable annotated bibliography of published Therapeutic Touch™ research from 1975 to July 2004 AND from July 2004 to July 2012 please see The Therapeutic Touch Network of Ontario website at http://www.therapeutictouchontario.org/, click learn from the drop down screen, then research bibliographies. Each of the published studies is summarized, including a description of:

•             study purpose

•             research design

•             characteristics of participants

•             nature of interventions

•             outcome variables

•             measured results

•             conclusions

•             recommendations

Therapeutic Touch is not intended to replace appropriate medical care; it is not a cure, but is intended to promote healing. Krieger defines cure as a remedy to get rid of an ailment, a course of medical treatment. The word heal is defined as to make whole, to make healthy, to bring into harmony. She explains, “healing has to do with how one thinks of oneself, one’s worldview or philosophy of life; it implies an enhancement of the quality of one’s life.”51 She states:” It (Therapeutic Touch) is simply an opportunity to actualize the natural human potential to help or heal yourself or others”.52

 

References

1)            Therapeutic Touch International Association www.therapeutic-touch.org

2)            Kunz, D. with Krieger, D. The Spiritual Dimension of Therapeutic Touch. Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, 2004.

3)            Gagne, D. (1994). The effects of Therapeutic Touch and relaxation therapy in reducing anxiety. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 8(3), 184-189.

4)            Heidt, P. (1981). Effect of Therapeutic Touch on anxiety level of hospitalized patients. Nursing Research, 30(1), 32-37.

5)            Quinn, J. F. (1984). Therapeutic Touch as energy exchange: Testing the theory. ANS Advances in Nursing Science, 6(2), 42-49.

6)            Zolfaghari, M., Eybpoosh, S., Hazrati, M. “Effects of Therapeutic Touch on Anxiety, Vital Signs, and Cardiac Dysrhythmia in a Sample of Iranian Women Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization Journal of Holistic Nursing 30.4 (2012): 225-234. Print

7)            Samarel, N., Fawcett, J., Davis, M. M., & Ryan, F. M. (1998). Effects of dialogue and Therapeutic Touch on preoperative and postoperative experiences of breast cancer surgery: An exploratory study. Oncology Nursing Forum, 25(8), 1369-1376.

8)            Quinn, J. F. (1993). Psychoimmunologic effects of Therapeutic Touch on practitioners and recently bereaved recipients: A pilot study. ANS Advances in Nursing Science, 15(4), 13-26.

9)            Lin, Y. S., & Gill Taylor, A. (1999). Effects of Therapeutic Touch in reducing pain and anxiety in an elderly population. Integrative Medicine, 1(4), 155-162.

10)          Simington, J. A., & Laing, G. P. (1993). Effects of Therapeutic Touch on anxiety in the institutionalized elderly. Clinical Nursing Research, 2(4), 438-450.

11)          Gregory, Sue and Julie Verdouw. “Therapeutic touch: Its application for residents in aged care." Australian Nursing Journal 12.7 (2005):1-3. Print.

12)          Coakley, Amanda and Mary Duffy. ‘The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Postoperative Patients.” Journal of Holistic Nursing 28.3 (2010): 193-200. Print.

13)          Ireland, M. (1998). Therapeutic touch with HIV-infected children: A pilot study. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 9(4), 68-77.

14)          Larden, Cheryl, M. Lynne Palmer and Patricia Janssen. “Efficacy of Therapeutic Touch in Treating Pregnant Inpatients Who Have a Chemical Dependency.” Journal of Holistic Nursing 22.4 (2004): 320-332. Print.

15)          Krieger, D. (1975). Therapeutic Touch: The imprimatur of Nursing. American Journal of Nursing, 75(5), 784-787.

16)          Wirth, D. P., Barrett, M. J., & Eidelman, W. S. (1994). Non-contact Therapeutic Touch and wound re-epithelialization: an extension of previous research. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 2(4), 187-192.

17)          Olson, M., Sneed, N., Bonadonna, R., Ratliff, J., & Dias, J. (1992). Therapeutic Touch and post-hurricane Hugo stress. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 10(2), 120-136.

18)          Lafreniere, K. D., Mutus, B., Cameron, S., Tannous, M., Giannotti, M., Abu-Zahra, H., et al. 1999). Effects of Therapeutic Touch on biochemical and mood indicators in women. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 5(4), 367-370.

19)          Giasson, M., & Bouchard, L. (1998). Effect of Therapeutic Touch on the well-being of persons with terminal cancer. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 16(3), 383-398.

20)          Olson, M., Sneed, N., Bonadonna, R., Ratliff, J., & Dias, J. (1992). Therapeutic Touch and post-hurricane Hugo stress. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 10(2), 120-136.

21)          Meehan, T. C. (1993). Therapeutic Touch and postoperative pain: A Rogerian research study. Nursing Science Quarterly, 6(2), 69-78.

22)          Barrington, R. (1994). A naturalistic inquiry of post-operative pain after Therapeutic Touch. In D. A. Gaut & A. Boykin (Eds.). Caring as healing: Renewal through hope, (pp. 199-213). New York: National League of Nursing.

23)          Denison, B. (2004). Touch the pain away: New research on Therapeutic Touch and persons with fibromyalgia syndrome. Holistic Nursing Practice, 18(3), 142-151.

24)          Gordon, A., Merenstein, J. H., D'Amico, F., & Hudgens, D. (1998). The effects of Therapeutic Touch on patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Journal of Family Practice, 47(4), 271-277.

25)          Smith, A. Ann, Sanford Kimmel and Sheryl Milz. ‘Effects of Therapeutic Touch on Pain, Function and Well Being in Persons with Osteo-Arthritis of the Knee: A Pilot Study.” The Internet Journal of Advanced Nursing Practice 10.2 ((2009): 1-25.

26)          Marta, Ilda, Sueli Baldan, Ani Berton, Michele Pavam, Maria da Silva. “The effectiveness of Therapeutic Touch on pain, depression and sleep in patients with chronic pain: clinical trial” Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP (2010) 44(4): 1094-1102.

27)          McCormack, Guy. “Using non-contact therapeutic touch to manage post –surgical pain in the elderly.” Occupational Therapy International 16.1 (2009): 44-56. Print.

28)          Aghabati, Nahid, Eesa Mohammadi and Zahra Esmaiel. “The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Pain and Fatigue of Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.” 7.3 eCAM (2010): 375-381. Print.

29)          Smith, D. W. (2001). Pattern changes in people experiencing Therapeutic Touch, phase II. Rogerian Nursing Science News Online, 1(1), [Abstract].

30)          Vaughan, S. (1995). The gentle touch. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 4(6), 359-368.

31)          Wirth, D. P. (1990). The effect of non-contact Therapeutic Touch on the healing rate of full thickness dermal wounds. Subtle Energies, 1(1), 1-20.

32)          Wirth, D. P., Richardson, J. T., Eidelman, W. S., & O' Malley, A. C. (1993). Full thickness dermal wounds treated with non-contact Therapeutic Touch: A replication and extension. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 1(3), 127-132.

33)          Smith, M. C., Reeder, F., Daniel, L., Baramee, J., & Hagman, J. (2003). Outcomes of touch therapies during bone marrow transplant. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 9(1), 40-49.

34)          Cox, C., & Hayes, J. (1999). Physiologic and psychodynamic responses to the administration of Therapeutic Touch in critical care. Complementary Therapies in Nursing and Midwifery, 5(3), 87-92.

35)          Braun, C., Layton, J., & Braun, J. (1986). Therapeutic Touch improves residents' sleep. American Health Care Association Journal, 12(1), 48-49.

36)          Doherty, Donna, Stephen Wright, Barry Aveyard and Meg Sykes. “Therapeutic Touch and dementia care: an ongoing journey.” Nursing Older People 18.11 (2006): 27-30. Print.

37)          Giasson, M., & Bouchard, L. (1998). Effect of Therapeutic Touch on the well-being of persons with terminal cancer. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 16(3), 383-398.

38)          Hanley, MA. “Therapeutic Touch With Preterm Infants: Composing a Treatment.” Explore 4.4 (2008):249-258. Print

39)          Eckes Peck, S. D. (1997). The efficacy of Therapeutic Touch for improving functional ability in elders with degenerative arthritis. Nursing Science Quarterly, 11(3), 123-132.

40)          Aghabati, Nahid, Eesa Mohammadi and Zahra Esmaiel. “The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Pain and Fatigue of Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.” 7.3 eCAM (2010): 375-381. Print.

41)          Krieger, D. (1975). Therapeutic Touch: The imprimatur of Nursing. American Journal of Nursing, 75(5), 784-787.

42)          Lafreniere, K. D., Mutus, B., Cameron, S., Tannous, M., Giannotti, M., Abu-Zahra, H., et al.(1999). Effects of Therapeutic Touch on biochemical and mood indicators in women. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 5(4), 367-370.

43)          Gronowicz, Gloria, Ankur Jhaveri, Libbe Clarke, Michael Aronow and Theresa Smith. “Therapeutic Touch Stimulates the Proliferation of Human Cells in Culture.” The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine 14.3 (2008): 233-239. Print.

44)          Jhaveri, Ankur, Stephen Walsh, Yatzen Wang, MaryBeth McCarthy, Gloria Gronowicz. “Therapeutic Touch Affects DNA Synthesis and Mineralization of Human Osteoblasts in Culture.” Journal of Orthopaedic Research 26 (2008): 1541-1546. Print.

45)          Quinn, J. F.(1993). Psychoimmunologic effects of Therapeutic Touch on practitioners and recently bereaved recipients: A pilot study. ANS Advances in Nursing Science, 15(4), 13-26.

46)          Coakley, Amanda and Mary Duffy. ‘The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Postoperative Patients.” Journal of Holistic Nursing 28.3 (2010): 193-200. Print.

47)          Woods, D. L., Craven, R., & Whitney, J. (1996). The effect of Therapeutic Touch on disruptive behaviors of individuals with dementia of the Alzheimer type. Alternative Therapies, 2(4), 95-96 [Abstract].

48)          Woods,D. L., Rapp, C. G., & Beck, C. (2004). Escalation/de-escalation patterns of behavioral symptoms of persons with dementia. Aging and Mental Health, 8(2), 126-132.

49)          Woods, D. L., & Dimond, M. (2002). The effect of Therapeutic Touch on agitated behavior and cortisol in persons with Alzheimer's Disease. Biological Research for Nursing, 4(2), 104-114.

50)          Fraser Health Hospice Residences: Creating a healing & caring environment at the end of life, Standards and guidelines for planning, development and operations published August 2007.

51)          Krieger, D. Therapeutic Touch As Transpersonal Healing. New York, NY: Lantern Books, 2002.

52)          Krieger, d. Accepting Your Power to Heal, The Personal Practice of Therapeutic Touch.Santa Fe, NM: Bear & Company, 1993.

53)          Gerentological Nurses Association of British Columbia (Gnabc), www.gnabc.com

54)          Merck Home Health Handbook, http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/special_subjects/complementary_and_alte...

55)          Fraser Health Hospice Residences: Creating a healing & caring environment at the end of life, Standards and guidelines for planning, development and operations published August 2007.

56)          Whitley, Julie Anne and Bonnie Rich. “A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Examining the Safety and Efficacy of Therapeutic Touch in Premature Infants.” Advances in Neonatal Care 8. 6 (2008): 2-19. Print.

57)          Hanley, MA. “Therapeutic Touch With Preterm Infants: Composing a Treatment.” Hanley, MA. “Therapeutic Touch With Preterm Infants: Composing a Treatment.” Explore 4.4 (2008):249-258. Print. 4.4 (2008):249-258. Print.

58)          Olson, M., Sneed, N., LaVia, M., Virella, G., Bonadonna, R., & Michel, Y. (1997). Stress-induced  immunosuppression and Therapeutic Touch. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 3(2), 68-74.

59)          Stephen, Joanna, Gina Mackenzie, Sarah Sample and Jennifer Macdonald. “Twenty years of therapeutic touch in a Canadian cancer agency: lessons learned from a case study of integrative oncology practice.” Support Care Cancer 2007; 15: 993-998. Print.

A Summary of Therapeutic Touch Research

 

Therapeutic TouchTM is a holistic, evidence-based therapy that incorporates the intentional and compassionate use of universal energy to promote balance and well-being1.

Therapeutic Touch is considered a pioneer among modern complementary methods of healing because it is the first healing modality in Western history to be formally taught as an intrinsic part of a fully accredited graduate curriculum of a college or university. This occurred at New York University (NYU), New York City, in 1975 in a masters-level course called “Frontiers in Nursing” (E41.2363).2

Therapeutic Touch is a gentle, non-invasive therapy utilizing near touch and light touch to support and stimulate the body’s own healing processes. There has been a great deal of research done on Therapeutic Touch. Therapeutic Touch has been shown to decrease anxiety and/or stress in the following populations: psychiatric patients with moderate to severe anxiety3, cardiovascular patients4,5, those undergoing cardiac catheterization6, those that have recently been diagnosed with breast cancer7, with those recently bereaved8, the elderly9, 10, 11, post-operative patients12, children with HIV13, chemically dependent pregnant women14, Alzheimer patients15, burn patients16, those who worked through or suffered a loss as a result of a hurricane17, healthy women18, and others19, 20.

Therapeutic Touch has been shown to decrease the perception of pain and/or decrease the need for analgesia in the following populations: vascular12, major elective or abdominal21, and coronary artery bypass surgeries22; fibromyalgia23;osteoarthritis24, 25; burn patients16; in the elderly9,26,27; cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy28; and others29,30.

Research suggests use of Therapeutic Touch accelerates wound healing31, 32, 33 and facilitates relaxation15, 22. It improves length and/or quality of sleep: in a critical care environment34, in chronic pain26, and the institutionalized elderly11, 35. Increased well-being has been shown in post-operative patients22, those experiencing dementia36, those with terminal cancer37, and with preterm infants with a gestational age of 25-37 weeks38. It has also been shown to improve depression26, quality of life23, increase function in those with arthritis24, 39, improve vigor18, decrease fatigue with cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy40, increase haemoglobin levels41, and decrease confusion42.

An in vitro study on normal human cells has shown Therapeutic Touch increases human cell proliferation43. A further in vitro study showed an increase in human DNA synthesis, differentiation and mineralization in osteoblasts (bone cells) and a decrease in osteosarcoma (bone cancer cells) with Therapeutic Touch44. A growing amount of research is suggesting Therapeutic Touch may positively influence the immune system58 by decreasing suppressor T cells45 and increasing natural killer cells46.

Therapeutic Touch has been safely practiced on people of all age groups. There has been research which demonstrates that Therapeutic Touch can be safely done on premature infants, less than 29 weeks gestation56; and that in preterms, 25 – 37 weeks gestation, the data suggests that it aids in their physiological and behavioral development and well-being57. Research has been done with children13, 19, and countless research studies have been done with adults and the elderly.

Therapeutic Touch has been shown to be effective in populations often thought to be fragile, such as preterms, children, the elderly, people with cancer, and dementia.

 

There has been a lot of research done on those with Alzheimer’s disease showing: decreased anxiety15; decreased vocalization, decreased manual manipulation, decreased disruptive behavior47,48; decreased pacing49, and decreased physical non-aggressive behavior. Using Therapeutic Touch may delay and/or prevent pharmacological therapies that could decrease the individual’s quality of life.

Another population that has been researched is those experiencing cancer. Therapeutic Touch has been shown to decrease anxiety7, 59, decrease fatigue28, increase well-being37, and decrease pain, and be beneficial in insomnia and needle phobias59.

As can be seen by reviewing the research above the amount of research with Therapeutic Touch has been extensive with more research continuing to be done.

For an easily downloadable annotated bibliography of published Therapeutic Touch™ research from 1975 to July 2004 AND from July 2004 to July 2012 please see The Therapeutic Touch Network of Ontario website at http://www.therapeutictouchontario.org/, click learn from the drop down screen, then research bibliographies. Each of the published studies is summarized, including a description of:

•             study purpose

•             research design

•             characteristics of participants

•             nature of interventions

•             outcome variables

•             measured results

•             conclusions

•             recommendations

Therapeutic Touch is not intended to replace appropriate medical care; it is not a cure, but is intended to promote healing. Krieger defines cure as a remedy to get rid of an ailment, a course of medical treatment. The word heal is defined as to make whole, to make healthy, to bring into harmony. She explains, “healing has to do with how one thinks of oneself, one’s worldview or philosophy of life; it implies an enhancement of the quality of one’s life.”51 She states:” It (Therapeutic Touch) is simply an opportunity to actualize the natural human potential to help or heal yourself or others”.52

 

References

1)            Therapeutic Touch International Association www.therapeutic-touch.org

2)            Kunz, D. with Krieger, D. The Spiritual Dimension of Therapeutic Touch. Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, 2004.

3)            Gagne, D. (1994). The effects of Therapeutic Touch and relaxation therapy in reducing anxiety. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 8(3), 184-189.

4)            Heidt, P. (1981). Effect of Therapeutic Touch on anxiety level of hospitalized patients. Nursing Research, 30(1), 32-37.

5)            Quinn, J. F. (1984). Therapeutic Touch as energy exchange: Testing the theory. ANS Advances in Nursing Science, 6(2), 42-49.

6)            Zolfaghari, M., Eybpoosh, S., Hazrati, M. “Effects of Therapeutic Touch on Anxiety, Vital Signs, and Cardiac Dysrhythmia in a Sample of Iranian Women Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization Journal of Holistic Nursing 30.4 (2012): 225-234. Print

7)            Samarel, N., Fawcett, J., Davis, M. M., & Ryan, F. M. (1998). Effects of dialogue and Therapeutic Touch on preoperative and postoperative experiences of breast cancer surgery: An exploratory study. Oncology Nursing Forum, 25(8), 1369-1376.

8)            Quinn, J. F. (1993). Psychoimmunologic effects of Therapeutic Touch on practitioners and recently bereaved recipients: A pilot study. ANS Advances in Nursing Science, 15(4), 13-26.

9)            Lin, Y. S., & Gill Taylor, A. (1999). Effects of Therapeutic Touch in reducing pain and anxiety in an elderly population. Integrative Medicine, 1(4), 155-162.

10)          Simington, J. A., & Laing, G. P. (1993). Effects of Therapeutic Touch on anxiety in the institutionalized elderly. Clinical Nursing Research, 2(4), 438-450.

11)          Gregory, Sue and Julie Verdouw. “Therapeutic touch: Its application for residents in aged care." Australian Nursing Journal 12.7 (2005):1-3. Print.

12)          Coakley, Amanda and Mary Duffy. ‘The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Postoperative Patients.” Journal of Holistic Nursing 28.3 (2010): 193-200. Print.

13)          Ireland, M. (1998). Therapeutic touch with HIV-infected children: A pilot study. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 9(4), 68-77.

14)          Larden, Cheryl, M. Lynne Palmer and Patricia Janssen. “Efficacy of Therapeutic Touch in Treating Pregnant Inpatients Who Have a Chemical Dependency.” Journal of Holistic Nursing 22.4 (2004): 320-332. Print.

15)          Krieger, D. (1975). Therapeutic Touch: The imprimatur of Nursing. American Journal of Nursing, 75(5), 784-787.

16)          Wirth, D. P., Barrett, M. J., & Eidelman, W. S. (1994). Non-contact Therapeutic Touch and wound re-epithelialization: an extension of previous research. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 2(4), 187-192.

17)          Olson, M., Sneed, N., Bonadonna, R., Ratliff, J., & Dias, J. (1992). Therapeutic Touch and post-hurricane Hugo stress. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 10(2), 120-136.

18)          Lafreniere, K. D., Mutus, B., Cameron, S., Tannous, M., Giannotti, M., Abu-Zahra, H., et al. 1999). Effects of Therapeutic Touch on biochemical and mood indicators in women. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 5(4), 367-370.

19)          Giasson, M., & Bouchard, L. (1998). Effect of Therapeutic Touch on the well-being of persons with terminal cancer. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 16(3), 383-398.

20)          Olson, M., Sneed, N., Bonadonna, R., Ratliff, J., & Dias, J. (1992). Therapeutic Touch and post-hurricane Hugo stress. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 10(2), 120-136.

21)          Meehan, T. C. (1993). Therapeutic Touch and postoperative pain: A Rogerian research study. Nursing Science Quarterly, 6(2), 69-78.

22)          Barrington, R. (1994). A naturalistic inquiry of post-operative pain after Therapeutic Touch. In D. A. Gaut & A. Boykin (Eds.). Caring as healing: Renewal through hope, (pp. 199-213). New York: National League of Nursing.

23)          Denison, B. (2004). Touch the pain away: New research on Therapeutic Touch and persons with fibromyalgia syndrome. Holistic Nursing Practice, 18(3), 142-151.

24)          Gordon, A., Merenstein, J. H., D'Amico, F., & Hudgens, D. (1998). The effects of Therapeutic Touch on patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Journal of Family Practice, 47(4), 271-277.

25)          Smith, A. Ann, Sanford Kimmel and Sheryl Milz. ‘Effects of Therapeutic Touch on Pain, Function and Well Being in Persons with Osteo-Arthritis of the Knee: A Pilot Study.” The Internet Journal of Advanced Nursing Practice 10.2 ((2009): 1-25.

26)          Marta, Ilda, Sueli Baldan, Ani Berton, Michele Pavam, Maria da Silva. “The effectiveness of Therapeutic Touch on pain, depression and sleep in patients with chronic pain: clinical trial” Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP (2010) 44(4): 1094-1102.

27)          McCormack, Guy. “Using non-contact therapeutic touch to manage post –surgical pain in the elderly.” Occupational Therapy International 16.1 (2009): 44-56. Print.

28)          Aghabati, Nahid, Eesa Mohammadi and Zahra Esmaiel. “The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Pain and Fatigue of Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.” 7.3 eCAM (2010): 375-381. Print.

29)          Smith, D. W. (2001). Pattern changes in people experiencing Therapeutic Touch, phase II. Rogerian Nursing Science News Online, 1(1), [Abstract].

30)          Vaughan, S. (1995). The gentle touch. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 4(6), 359-368.

31)          Wirth, D. P. (1990). The effect of non-contact Therapeutic Touch on the healing rate of full thickness dermal wounds. Subtle Energies, 1(1), 1-20.

32)          Wirth, D. P., Richardson, J. T., Eidelman, W. S., & O' Malley, A. C. (1993). Full thickness dermal wounds treated with non-contact Therapeutic Touch: A replication and extension. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 1(3), 127-132.

33)          Smith, M. C., Reeder, F., Daniel, L., Baramee, J., & Hagman, J. (2003). Outcomes of touch therapies during bone marrow transplant. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 9(1), 40-49.

34)          Cox, C., & Hayes, J. (1999). Physiologic and psychodynamic responses to the administration of Therapeutic Touch in critical care. Complementary Therapies in Nursing and Midwifery, 5(3), 87-92.

35)          Braun, C., Layton, J., & Braun, J. (1986). Therapeutic Touch improves residents' sleep. American Health Care Association Journal, 12(1), 48-49.

36)          Doherty, Donna, Stephen Wright, Barry Aveyard and Meg Sykes. “Therapeutic Touch and dementia care: an ongoing journey.” Nursing Older People 18.11 (2006): 27-30. Print.

37)          Giasson, M., & Bouchard, L. (1998). Effect of Therapeutic Touch on the well-being of persons with terminal cancer. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 16(3), 383-398.

38)          Hanley, MA. “Therapeutic Touch With Preterm Infants: Composing a Treatment.” Explore 4.4 (2008):249-258. Print

39)          Eckes Peck, S. D. (1997). The efficacy of Therapeutic Touch for improving functional ability in elders with degenerative arthritis. Nursing Science Quarterly, 11(3), 123-132.

40)          Aghabati, Nahid, Eesa Mohammadi and Zahra Esmaiel. “The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Pain and Fatigue of Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.” 7.3 eCAM (2010): 375-381. Print.

41)          Krieger, D. (1975). Therapeutic Touch: The imprimatur of Nursing. American Journal of Nursing, 75(5), 784-787.

42)          Lafreniere, K. D., Mutus, B., Cameron, S., Tannous, M., Giannotti, M., Abu-Zahra, H., et al.(1999). Effects of Therapeutic Touch on biochemical and mood indicators in women. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 5(4), 367-370.

43)          Gronowicz, Gloria, Ankur Jhaveri, Libbe Clarke, Michael Aronow and Theresa Smith. “Therapeutic Touch Stimulates the Proliferation of Human Cells in Culture.” The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine 14.3 (2008): 233-239. Print.

44)          Jhaveri, Ankur, Stephen Walsh, Yatzen Wang, MaryBeth McCarthy, Gloria Gronowicz. “Therapeutic Touch Affects DNA Synthesis and Mineralization of Human Osteoblasts in Culture.” Journal of Orthopaedic Research 26 (2008): 1541-1546. Print.

45)          Quinn, J. F.(1993). Psychoimmunologic effects of Therapeutic Touch on practitioners and recently bereaved recipients: A pilot study. ANS Advances in Nursing Science, 15(4), 13-26.

46)          Coakley, Amanda and Mary Duffy. ‘The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Postoperative Patients.” Journal of Holistic Nursing 28.3 (2010): 193-200. Print.

47)          Woods, D. L., Craven, R., & Whitney, J. (1996). The effect of Therapeutic Touch on disruptive behaviors of individuals with dementia of the Alzheimer type. Alternative Therapies, 2(4), 95-96 [Abstract].

48)          Woods,D. L., Rapp, C. G., & Beck, C. (2004). Escalation/de-escalation patterns of behavioral symptoms of persons with dementia. Aging and Mental Health, 8(2), 126-132.

49)          Woods, D. L., & Dimond, M. (2002). The effect of Therapeutic Touch on agitated behavior and cortisol in persons with Alzheimer's Disease. Biological Research for Nursing, 4(2), 104-114.

50)          Fraser Health Hospice Residences: Creating a healing & caring environment at the end of life, Standards and guidelines for planning, development and operations published August 2007.

51)          Krieger, D. Therapeutic Touch As Transpersonal Healing. New York, NY: Lantern Books, 2002.

52)          Krieger, d. Accepting Your Power to Heal, The Personal Practice of Therapeutic Touch.Santa Fe, NM: Bear & Company, 1993.

53)          Gerentological Nurses Association of British Columbia (Gnabc), www.gnabc.com

54)          Merck Home Health Handbook, http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/special_subjects/complementary_and_alte...

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56)          Whitley, Julie Anne and Bonnie Rich. “A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Examining the Safety and Efficacy of Therapeutic Touch in Premature Infants.” Advances in Neonatal Care 8. 6 (2008): 2-19. Print.

57)          Hanley, MA. “Therapeutic Touch With Preterm Infants: Composing a Treatment.” Hanley, MA. “Therapeutic Touch With Preterm Infants: Composing a Treatment.” Explore 4.4 (2008):249-258. Print. 4.4 (2008):249-258. Print.

58)          Olson, M., Sneed, N., LaVia, M., Virella, G., Bonadonna, R., & Michel, Y. (1997). Stress-induced  immunosuppression and Therapeutic Touch. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 3(2), 68-74.

59)          Stephen, Joanna, Gina Mackenzie, Sarah Sample and Jennifer Macdonald. “Twenty years of therapeutic touch in a Canadian cancer agency: lessons learned from a case study of integrative oncology practice.” Support Care Cancer 2007; 15: 993-998. Print.

Therapeutic Touch Sessions Offered in Langley, B.C.

Feeling stressed? Having pain? Maybe your body is trying to tell you it's time to slow down and relax. Beginning July 22, 2013 I will be offering Therapeutic Touch sessions at 19792 - 30th Avenue in Langley. Sessions will be by appointment only, Monday - Friday 9:00am - 4:00pm. Call 604-510-0190 and ask for Cheryl to book your session. You deserve it!

The BC Therpaeutic Touch Network Society Annual Conference is May 4, 2013

This year's conference will be held in Tsawwassen at Tsawwassen United Church, 693 - 53 Street.

"Awakening the Doctor Within: Hypnosis in Health"

Some of the topics to be discussed Include: The psychology of illness, the power of belief, thought and energy, hypnosis techniques, how to listen to your body and more.

Cost $135.00 for BCTTNS members and $155.00 for non-members.

To learn more contact Marie-Paule Wiley at mpawiley@hotmail.com or check out the BCTTNS website: www.bctherapeutictouch.com

or send in your registration and payment to BCTTNS, c/o #7 - 5260 Ferry Rd., Delta, B.C. V4K 4Y4  

Therapeutic Touch Retreat

Come replenish your soul, nourish yourself, learn, and connect with other TTers.

If you have taken a minimum of Therapeutic Touch Level 1 consider becoming a BCTTNS member and register before March 15th for the early bird price. A huge savings!

Poster on upcoming BC Therapeutic Touch Network Retreat April 27-29, 2012

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